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HCRS to Host Autism Awareness Events in April

The month of April is designated Autism Awareness month in order to highlight the growing need for awareness about Autism. In support of this effort, HCRS will be offering several events and activities throughout the month.

On the evening of April 1st, HCRS will join the international “Light It Up Blue” Autism Awareness campaign by placing a blue light in each of our offices. This global initiative was started by Autism Speaks in 2010 in an effort to raise awareness of Autism Awareness Day on April 2.

HCRS will also be hosting several Autism events for the community:

HCRS’ Developmental Services Program will be extending their Social Skills Classes for Teens with Autism throughout the month of April. Classes will continue to be held out of HCRS’ Springfield and Brattleboro Elm Street offices every Wednesday from 3:30 – 4:30 pm.

On Monday, April 18, from 6:00 – 8:00 pm, HCRS will be hosting a Bowl for Autism Awareness community event at Upper Valley Lanes and Games in White River Junction. There will be free bowling for HCRS clients and caregivers as well as information for the community about Autism.

On Thursday, April 28, from 5:30 – 7:00 pm, HCRS will host an Autism Awareness Informational Night for Parents at the Dish on Main Street Restaurant in Saxtons River. Participants will learn about Autism and available community services and resources. Parents and staff will share their stories and provide education about Autism. Refreshments will be served and a wide selection of Autism materials will be available.

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of developmental disabilities affecting the brain. There is no known cause for ASD, but it can impact a person’s functioning at different levels. A person with an ASD may not look any different, but they may communicate, interact, behave, and learn in different ways. Many people with ASD have problems with social, emotional, and communication skills. Autism spectrum disorders begin during early childhood and last throughout a person’s life. If you suspect your child may have an ASD, talk with your child’s doctor or school and ask for a referral to an agency like HCRS. Early intervention has shown to be the best tool to help your child reach their true potential. For more information, go to www.cdc.gov/actearly.

For information about any of these events, please contact Charmion Lea Handy, HCRS Children’s Coordinator for Developmental Services at (802) 463-3532 ext. 1243. All of these activities are supported through HCRS’ Autism Fund.